Friday, 21 July 2017

Quiz for Lessons 226 - 230 - Parts of the Sentence - Participles

Instructions: Combine these sentences using a participial phrase.

1. I strolled down the lane. I was enjoying the fragrant air.

2. My dog wanted his meal. He was begging at my feet.

3. The contestant crossed her fingers for luck. She hoped it was the right answer.

4. The paramedic leaned over the victim. He was checking for vital signs.

5. The man shouted for help. He was hanging on the side of the boat.

Instructions: Rewrite these sentences so the participial phrase is used correctly.

6. Drinking in gulps, the pitcher was emptied.

7. Convinced of my honesty, I was allowed to leave.

8. Watching the sunset, the evening was beautiful.

9. Hanging in the closet, I found my new suit.

10. We saw several caves walking through the mountains.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Enjoying the fragrant air, I strolled down the lane.

2. Begging at my feet, my dog wanted his meal.

3. Hoping it was the right answer, the contestant crossed her fingers for luck.

4. Checking for vital signs, the paramedic leaned over the victim.

5. Hanging on the side of the boat, the man shouted for help.

6. Drinking in gulps, I emptied the pitcher.

7. Convinced of my honesty, the police allowed me to leave.

8. Watching the sunset, I found the evening beautiful.

9. I found my new suit hanging in the closet.

10. Walking through the mountains, we saw several caves.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/quiz-for-lessons-226-230-parts-of.html

Monday, 17 July 2017

Lesson 226 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases are useful in combining pairs of sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using a participial phrase following the word it modifies.

1. The woman fed the pigeons. The woman was sitting on the park bench.

2. Jeanne finished the painting last month. The painting was hanging on the wall.

3. I really liked the blue sports car. The car was sitting in the showroom.

4. That man makes jewelry. He is getting into his car.

5. I carefully wrapped the package to be sure it was done correctly. The package was lying on the desk.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The woman sitting on the park bench fed the pigeons.

2. Last month Jeanne finished the painting hanging on the wall.

3. I really liked the blue sports car sitting in the showroom.

4. That man getting into his car makes jewelry.

5. I carefully wrapped the package lying on the desk to be sure it was done correctly.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/lesson-226-parts-of-sentence-verbals.html

Friday, 14 July 2017

Quiz for Lessons 221 - 225 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

Instructions: Find the infinitives, participles, and the participial and infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. My attempts to comfort the lost boy were useless.

2. Having been left behind, the puppy gave a whining howl.

3. The exhausted men were given the signal to start the march.

4. The admired musician wants a person to study with him.

5. The screaming fans cheered their fighting team.

6. The droning lecture caused the students' heads to nod.

7. Having finished our work, we now had time to play.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to comfort the lost boy modifies attempts; lostmodifies boy

2. Having been left behind modifies puppy; whiningmodifies howl

3. exhausted modifies men; to start the march modifiessignal

4. admired modifies musician; to study with him modifies person

5. screaming modifies fans; fighting modifies team

6. droning modifies lecture; to nod modifies heads

7. Having finished our work modifies we; to playmodifies time

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/quiz-for-lessons-221-225-parts-of.html

Monday, 10 July 2017

Lesson 222 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Taking my time, I hit the basket.

2. Shouting angrily, the man chased the thief.

3. Exhausted from the hike, Jim dropped to the ground.

4. Grinning sheepishly, the boy asked for a date.

5. Trying to open the gate, I tore my coat.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Taking my time modifies the subject I

2. Shouting angrily modifies the subject man

3. Exhausted from the hike modifies the subject Jim

4. Grinning sheepishly modifies the subject boy

5. Trying to open the gate modifies the subject I


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/lesson-222-parts-of-sentence-verbals.html

Sunday, 9 July 2017

Lesson 221 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

Instructions: Find the participles in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The bike had a broken spoke.

2. Her smiling face made everyone happy.

3. The frightened child was crying loudly.

4. The people were frightened by the growling dog.

5. The squeaking wheel needs some grease.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. broken modifying spoke

2. smiling modifying face

3. frightened modifying child

4. growling modifying dog

5. squeaking modifying wheel

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/lesson-221-parts-of-sentence-verbals.html

Friday, 7 July 2017

Quiz for Lessons 216 - 220 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Noun Infinitives

Instructions: Find the noun infinitive phrases in the following sentences and tell how they are used.

1. To sit in judgment is a difficult task.

2. To waste time in class is foolishness.

3. To party and to sleep in were his only faults.

4. My grandfather wanted only to build a home and raise a family.

5. Barbara hopes to be home soon.

6. His joys were to play soccer and to visit friends.

7. To save money for a rainy day is a good idea.

8. The man's goal was to go to college and to study law.

9. Everyone wants to be rewarded for one's efforts.

10. Our desire is nothing but to live happily.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. to sit in judgment = subject

2. to waste time in class = subject

3. to party/to sleep in = subjects

4. to build a home/(to) raise a family = direct objects

5. to be home soon = direct object

6. to play soccer/to visit friends = predicate nominatives

7. to save money for a rainy day = subject

8. to go to college/to study law = predicate nominatives

9. to be rewarded for one's efforts = direct object

10. to live happily = object of the preposition

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/quiz-for-lessons-216-220-parts-of.html

Thursday, 6 July 2017

Lesson 220 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Noun Infinitives

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as a noun. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

The noun infinitive can be a subject (To eat is fun.); a direct object (I like to eat.); a predicate nominative (A fun thing is to eat.); an appositive (My hope, to travel, never happened.); an object of a preposition (I want nothing but to save.)

Noun infinitives can have with them direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives or modifiers to form what is called a infinitive phrase. Example: To eat solid foods is hard for babies. "To eat" is the noun infinitive used as the subject of the verb is, and it has its own direct object "foods" with the adjective "solid," which together make up the infinitive phrase "to eat solid foods" serving as the subject of the sentence.

Noun infinitives may be compound. Example: I want to eat and to sleep. Sometimes the second to is left off. (I want to eat and sleep.)

Instructions: Find the noun infinitive phrases in the following sentences and tell how they are used.

1. Everyone wants to enjoy life.

2. She likes to be admired.

3. Two bad habits are to smoke cigarettes and to drink alcohol.

4. To stop the car suddenly can be dangerous.

5. To cheat is a sign of weakness.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to enjoy life = direct object

2. to be admired = direct object

3. to smoke cigarettes/to drink alcohol = predicate nominatives

4. to stop the car suddenly = subject

5. to cheat = subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/07/lesson-220-parts-of-sentence-verbals.html